Applying job

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Applying job

Post  burmanone on Tue Mar 10, 2009 11:46 am

Q;actually i'm now working in S'pore using S'pass, I'm holder of Bachelor of engineering ( Mechanical), 1993. Recently working at oil & chemical field, if u have any idea to advice me regarding about seeeking job in Canada pls let me know,

A;Nomally people apply PR first.,,with your level I think easy to apply for that.After people arrive to canada they go to university and get some courses( for you engineering Mechanical), )because canada only respect local degree I do not know why they proud like that.
I have some sample for you ,,One burmese guy worked in Malaysia with burmese passport same like your level(R.I.T).he earn some money and apply canada PR then their family move to canada and he bought the hourse ,he go to university and getting short term course.
and looking and working same field in canada .After 5 years he got the citizen ,he apply to same job same company in Malaysia before he working ,,,he got more money then before he came to canada because he is canadian citizen now.He come back two time a year to see family also his wife go to Malaysia see him too.you want to know why he move to canada with his family,His daughter is studying 2nd yrs (medical ) in university now.People only think about their children' furture.So they move to canada.
Now alberta provience is very rich with oil.see in following link below....

http://www.energy.gov.ab.ca/OurBusiness/oilsands.asp
http://search.yahoo.com/search?ei=UTF-8&fr=b1ie7&p=alberta+canada++oilfield&SpellState=n-1711040389_q-Y%2Fy7h14wQWsz8%2FQJ8HtLvgAAAA%40%40&fr2=sp-top

burmanone

Number of posts : 164
Age : 107
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Federal government delivers on protection for workers

Post  burmanone on Tue Mar 10, 2009 12:02 pm

It is not surprising for countries facing tough economic times to implement measures intended to better protect their domestic workers.

In Canada, this responsibility falls on the shoulders of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC).

Subject to certain exceptions, Canadian employers who wish to recruit foreign workers must demonstrate to HRSDC how the entry of the foreign worker(s) will transfer skills and knowledge to Canadians, fill a labour shortage, or directly create or retain job opportunities for other Canadians.

Canadian employers who wish to recruit overseas must first make an application to HRSDC for a Labour Market Opinion (LMO). If HRSDC is satisfied that the recruitment of a foreigner is in our interests, it will issue a positive LMO which then paves the way for the chosen foreign worker to submit a work permit application at a Canadian visa post overseas.

On Jan. 1, HRSDC implemented a national advertising requirement for all occupations.

The failure to comply with these minimum advertising requirements “will result in the application for a LMO being denied.”

As a general rule of thumb, the more complex the position, the less advertising is needed since those skill sets are believed to be harder to find here. The “lower” the position, the more likely it is perceived that we should be able to find someone locally to do the job.

Accordingly, employers who are offering positions in management or in occupations which usually require a university degree (i.e. positions described in our National Occupations Classification as skill levels O and A) must advertise the position on the national job bank (www.jobbank.gc.ca) for at least 14 calendar days. Alternatively, they can conduct similar recruitment activities consistent with the practices prevailing within that occupation. This can include advertising in professional journals, newsletters, national newspapers, or even consulting with unions or professional associations. These efforts must be made during the three months prior to the LMO application.

For occupations which usually require college education or apprenticeship training (i.e. NOC B occupations) advertising in the national job bank is mandatory and cannot be substituted with the alternatives listed above. Additionally, the advertisements must include the employers name and address and must disclose the wages being offered. This latter requirement will make this type of recruitment more delicate since existing employees will have access to the wages being offered to their foreign counterparts.

Lastly, employers who are recruiting those in occupations which require only high school education, occupation-specific training, or on-the-job training (i.e. NOC C and D occupations) must advertise on the job bank and must conduct other recruitment activities consistent with the practice in the occupation in question, all within three months of the LMO application. They must also demonstrate reasonable “ongoing” recruitment efforts in communities which face barriers to employment i.e. Aboriginals, seniors, and other disadvantaged groups.

HRSDC makes it clear that these requirements are the minimum efforts that can be expended and reserves the right to impose additional requirements.

From a public policy point of view, the recruitment of foreign workers is tricky business at the best of times. In the worst of times, the public insists on greater protection.

Now, it’s been delivered.

burmanone

Number of posts : 164
Age : 107
Location : toronto Canada
Registration date : 2009-03-09

View user profile http://www.yeyintnge.blogspot.com

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